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Original research (Published On: 31-Mar-2022)

Effects of supplemental irrigation and water harvesting technique on productivity of rainfed sesame (Sesamum indicum L) crop in heavy clay soils

Hassan Mohammed and Ali Hassan

J. Agri. Res. Adv., 04 (01):32-42

Hassan Mohammed: Lecturer at SUST

Ali Hassan: Sudan University of Science and Technology, Sudan

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Article History: Received on: 24-Jan-22, Accepted on: 28-Mar-22, Published on: 31-Mar-22

Corresponding Author: Hassan Mohammed

Email: Hassantal@gmail.com

Citation: Hassan IM, Ali H and Khalid OB (2022). Effects of supplemental irrigation and water harvesting technique on productivity of rainfed sesame (Sesamum indicum L) crop in heavy clay soils. J. Agri. Res. Adv., 04 (01):32-42


Abstract

Aim: The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of supplemental irrigation and water harvesting technique on the productivity of rain-fed sesame (Sesamum indicum L) crop in Sudan's Butana-Heavy Clay Soil.

Materials and Methods: Effects of two in situ water harvesting techniques (tied ridges and conventional contour basin) and eight combinations of supplemental irrigation techniques at three growth stages of sesame crop (Sesamum indicum L.) were studied during two seasons in split-plot arrangement with randomized three replicated treatments in Butana-clay plain of Sudan. The crop phenological stages were from emergence to flowering (initiation and vegetative), flowering and heading maturity, and ripening.  The irrigation treatments included supplementary irrigation in each growth stage or a combination of two and three growth stages, full irrigation, and the without irrigation (rain-fed) treatments.

Results: The results of statistical analysis of data collected during each one of the studied years and their combination indicated that the productivity of rain-grown crops was reduced whenever a deficit in water supply occurs due to bad distribution of rainfall during any crop growth stage. Supplementary irrigation can save the crop from complete failure in any dry year, and improve crop productivity. No significant differences between basins and furrows and they store a limited amount of water in the soil. The storage of the harvested water in the pond to be used when water shortage occurs always results in significant improvement in crop productivity.

Conclusion: It was concluded that Supplementary irrigation during the first crop growth stage or its combination with other stages results in significantly pronounced improvements in all aspects of crop productivity.


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